Finally finished.

Well one stubborn axle nut and some rainy weather made for a worthless Thursday.  But I put the car back together enough to go down the street and get somebody with a real impact wrench to break it loose for me and that did the trick!  So here’s the rest of the junk I replaced.

Once the tie rods are out you can pull the pin and take off the nut for the upper ball joint.

Before the tie rods are out you can pull the pin and take off the nut for the upper ball joint.

Then remove the brake line bracket from the ball joint stud.  This will allow you to move the brake caliper out of the way later.

Then remove the brake line bracket from the ball joint stud. This will allow you to move the brake caliper out of the way later.

It might seem a little redneck, but take a sturdy screwdriver and stick it through the opening in brake caliper and into one of the openings along the outside of the brake rotor.  This will keep the hub from turning in the next few steps.

It might seem a little redneck, but take a sturdy screwdriver and stick it through the opening in brake caliper and into one of the openings along the outside of the brake rotor. This will keep the hub from turning in the next few steps.

Then pull the cotter pin from the axle nut and remove the retainer.

Then pull the cotter pin from the axle nut and remove the retainer.

Then get a big ass socket (36mm in this case) and loosen the axle nut.  This was the PITA part because the passenger side was really on tight.  Ended up having to take it to a shop and they broke it loose for free.  If you ever have to do this.  Good luck!

Then get a big ass socket (36mm in this case) and loosen the axle nut. This was the PITA part because the passenger side was really on tight. Ended up having to take it to a shop and they broke it loose for free. If you ever have to do this. Good luck!

Then its time to crawl back under the car and take loose the six bolts that hold the axle to the output shaft.

Then it's time to crawl back under the car and take loose the six bolts that hold the axle to the output shaft.

Then I took the brake caliper off and used a delicate and specialized tool called an old coat hanger to tie the caliper up and out of the way.  Then removed the rotor and then the tie rods using the same method as the last post.

Then I took the brake caliper off and used a delicate and specialized tool called an "old coat hanger" to tie the caliper up and out of the way. Then removed the rotor and then the tie rods using the same method as the previous post.

Now more of this fun stuff.  I finally got me a BFH and hammered apart the upper ball joint using the same pickle fork I used for the tie rod ends.  MUCH quicker with a BFH!

Now more of this fun stuff. I finally got me a BFH and hammered apart the upper ball joint using the same pickle fork I used for the tie rod ends. MUCH quicker with a BFH!

Once that is loose the spindle and hub drops down and theres FINALLY enough room to pull the old drive axle out!  Very gratifying moment.

Once that is loose the spindle and hub drops down and there's FINALLY enough room to pull the old drive axle out! Very gratifying moment.

The axle doesnt NEED to be out to change shocks, but there sure is a lot more room, so its best to do that before the new axle goes in.  First I just cracked loose the bolts holding the shock in the mount.

The axle doesn't NEED to be out to change shocks, but there sure is a lot more room, so it's best to do that before the new axle goes in. First I just cracked loose the bolts holding the shock in the mount.

Upper shock mount.

Upper shock mount.

Next, before I removed the bolts for the shock, I placed a jack under the lower control arm.  This is so when the shock is removed, the jack will keep the control arm from being violently pushed down.  If you didnt do this and you pulled the shock out anyway, the whole thing would to POP like a jack-in-the-box.

Next, before I removed the bolts for the shock, I placed a jack under the lower control arm. This is so when the shock is removed, the jack will keep the control arm from being violently pushed down. If you didn't do this and you pulled the shock out anyway, the whole thing would to POP like a jack-in-the-box.

Then its real easy.  Take the bolts out and the old shock slides right out, and the new one is ready to go in!

Then it's real easy. Take the bolts out and the old shock slides right out, and the new one is ready to go in!

BAM!

BAM!

Now I just basically start working my way back to the beginning, only using nice NEW parts instead of crusty old ones. The new axle slides in nicely.

Now I just basically start working my way back to the beginning, only using nice NEW parts instead of crusty old ones. The new axle slides in nicely.

Once its all back together, it looks good!  And is a lot more solid too!

Once it's all back together, it looks good! And is a lot more solid too!

So I just got it back from the shop and took it for a drive on the highway.  Runs right down the road!  Felt good to have the car back cruising again.  Looking forward to some trips now in a more comfortable ride.  Not that Andrea’s car isn’t comfortable.  It’s just not as… roomy.  Hehe.  So finally a project I can knock off the list.  Next, repainting the Mustang.  Plenty of pictures coming for that too I’m sure!

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Posted on April 10, 2009, in Cars. Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Totally impressive! I can’t even change the oil in the car!

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